Flower Mound Lacrosse

Flower Mound Lacrosse

by Steve Gamel

Scout McLain is only a fifth-grader, but she’s already a lacrosse veteran and one of hundreds of kids in the Flower Mound Lacrosse Association who, by the time they reach high school, will have been playing competitively for nearly a decade.

That’s the level of commitment and excitement FMLA has from its loyal following – and participation continues
to climb.

“The way we see it, get a lacrosse stick into their hands,” Scout’s mom, Stacy McLain said. Stacy is the association’s community outreach chair. “The rest takes care of itself. More and more kids are eager to try something different.”

Stacy added, “That number will continue to grow as players begin playing earlier in elementary school.”

Lacrosse may not be considered by many to be a mainstream sport like football, baseball, basketball, or even soccer. But it’s probably been around longer, and many of the same skills, agility, and hand-eye coordination needed to play those so-called “popular” sports are essential to be successful in lacrosse. Scout, who has been playing since the second grade, can carry, pass, catch, and score goals with the best of them. She’s one of what is now 250 to 300 kids (girls and boys) who register each season, and those numbers include first graders all the way up to high schoolers.

Many of those high school players are decorated stars on and off the field. According to the association’s website, senior varsity player and recent Flower Mound High School graduate, Ryan Sauer, was recognized as a 2018 Academic All-American. Six more players were named all-state, all-district, or honorable mention by the Texas High School Lacrosse League, including Sammy Cambere, Brady King, Kelly Marion, Vinny Ianiero, Sutton James, and Ben Snyder.

They all owe their success to FMLA. The association, which started in 2009 as a small program offered through the Cross Timbers YMCA, outgrew its previous home in a matter of two years. It is now a non-profit 501c3 dedicated to fostering and promoting a safe, disciplined, respectful, and team-oriented program where boys (1st through 12th grade) and girls (3rd through 12th grade) can learn the fundamentals of lacrosse, develop skills to be competitive in the game, as well as build the essential characteristics of good sportsmanship along with strong character.

FMLA hosts all home games at the Community Activity Center in Flower Mound and offers both fall and spring seasons. Its fall season is primarily a tournament period where they can face teams from Southlake, Frisco, and even McKinney. Kids who participate during the fall hit the ground running during the spring, which is considered lacrosse season.

The association services athletes from Flower Mound, Lewisville, Highland Village, and the surrounding areas.

“The great thing is that it’s not just the boys; girls are picking up the sticks, too, and catching on fast,” McLain said. “And beyond the sport, we believe heavily in giving back to the community. Our senior boys recently built a wheelchair ramp for a family in Fort Worth, and we have a group of girls who will be working on various community service projects this summer. It’s a family out here. We all care about each other and are around one another constantly.”

Credit coaches and officials for not only creating an inclusive environment but also consistently sparking interest at a grassroots level. FMLA offers a free introductory clinic twice a year – one during the summer and again in the fall – for kids who are considering taking up the sport. On top of that, they host lacrosse booths at various town or school events.

“We’ll have the sticks and goals and give kids who come by a chance to shoot a goal,” McLain said. “As soon as the kids grab the stick, they get incredibly excited. It’s a chance for them to have fun and try something different.”


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